Radio Sandwell Health News

Girl's epilepsy seizures reduced drastically due to cannabis

2015-05-22 19:21:41

Addyson BentonThe family moved to Castle Rock, Colorado from Ohio to legally purchase medical patches

The parents of a three-year-old girl with epilepsy claim that since being treated with medical cannabis her daily seizures have fallen from more than 100 a day to fewer than 10.

Addyson Benton’s family moved to Castle Rock, Colorado from their home in Ohio to legally purchase a specially designed cannabis-extract for her treatment.

The marijuana, which is administered through a patch, contains THCA, a biosynthetic precursor of THC, the active component of cannabis.

 

Her family reported that within hours of taking the patch, Addyson’s health improved dramatically, not only in the drop in seizures, but in her ability to walk and say new words.

Her family did not want to risk her treatment before moving, as they were afraid Ohio officials would seize Addyson if they attempted to administer the drugs, illegal in Ohio.

To offset the costs of the move to their new home, Addyson’s aunt set up a GoFundMe page which raised more than $3,000.

"It breaks our heart to think of all the kids who are left behind because they can't afford to move out," Mrs Benton told Mic.

"I can't help but think that if Governor Kasich were faced with this from his own grandchild ... that he wouldn't make a difference or a change for Ohioans."

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