The South African government says former President Nelson Mandela's medical condition remains unchanged.

"> The South African government says former President Nelson Mandela's medical condition remains unchanged.

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Radio Sandwell African / Caribbean News

Nelson Mandela's condition 'unchanged'

2013-06-26 03:26:32

Nelson Mandela
Nelson Mandela is being treated for a recurring
lung infection

The South African government says former President Nelson Mandela's medical condition remains unchanged.

Mr Mandela, 94, has been in a Pretoria hospital since 8 June being treated for a recurring lung infection, and his condition became critical on Sunday.

"Doctors continue to do their best to ensure his recovery, well-being and comfort," the latest update said.

The statement came as Mr Mandela's family members were meeting at his home in the village of Qunu.

His eldest daughter, Makaziwe, and some grandchildren were said to be at the meeting in Eastern Cape province.

Little has emerged from the family meeting, which South African media say was called to discuss "sensitive family business".

Nelson Mandela
Doves are released outside the hospital in Pretoria
where Nelson Mandela is being treated

In the latest statement President Zuma thanked the South African public for "ongoing support and understanding".

His spokesman said on Monday that South Africans should not hold out "false hopes".

Doves

Mandela family members, including grandchildren, have continued to visit him in hospital, where dozens of white doves were released by a local businessman in tribute.

The scene at the hospital, where well-wishers have decorated a wall with flowers and supportive messages, is described as quiet, save for waiting journalists.

It is Mr Mandela's third stay in hospital this year with lung problems which are thought to date from damage sustained while working in a prison quarry.

He contracted tuberculosis in the 1980s while being held in jail on the windy Robben Island.

Mr Mandela is revered for leading the fight against white minority rule in South Africa and then preaching reconciliation despite being imprisoned for 27 years. He left power after five years as the country's first black president.

He retired from public life in 2004 and has rarely been seen at official events since.

Source: bbc.co.uk

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